Chocolate Einkorn Sandwich Cookies with Coconut Cream

When I first heard about Einkorn flour, I was more than a little intrigued. The promise of flour free of the problems associated with modern wheat seemed too good to be true; I ordered some online and couldn’t wait to give it a try.

My kids often clamor for cookies, so when my Einkorn flour arrived, this simple shortbread-like dough was the first thing I made. I was hoping for intensely flavored chocolate treats that would stay crispy, even when used in cookie sandwiches; these turned out perfectly.

In addition to the Einkorn flour (which is a dream to work with, by the way), these cookies feature fair-trade cocoa and chocolate. They are perfectly delicious on their own, but you can also try sandwiching 2 together with the coconut cream icing in the middle to make a treat reminiscent of “Oreos,” only much healthier.

cookies for NK 1 (1)

Chocolate Einkorn Sandwich Cookies with Coconut Cream
 
Ingredients
For the Cookies
  • ½ cup salted butter, preferably organic/pastured, softened
  • ½ cup whole, unrefined cane sugar
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup sifted Einkorn flour (get it here).
  • 3 tablespoons cocoa powder
  • Pinch fine sea salt
  • 1½ oz/45 g 85% dark chocolate, melted in a double boiler
  • About ⅓ cup unrefined sugar, for pressing the cookies into before baking
For the Frosting
Instructions
  1. Cream butter with sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer until smooth. Beat in vanilla extract.
  2. Stir whisked flour together with cocoa powder and salt in a medium bowl, then add to the butter/sugar/vanilla mixture. Beat on low speed until combined. Add the melted chocolate and mix on low until the dough comes together. Note that the dough will be quite soft at this point, and that’s fine.
  3. Form dough into a log (about 12 inches long and 1 ¼ inch in diameter) and wrap in parchment paper. Refrigerate overnight, or at least for a few hours.
  4. Heat oven to 325 degrees F. and line 2 cookie sheets with parchment paper. Remove dough from refrigerator and allow to stand for about 5 minutes while you prepare the icing by whipping together the cold coconut cream and the powdered sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer. Refrigerate until ready to use.
  5. Using a sharp knife, cut dough into thin slices (just shy of ¼ inch).
  6. Pour ⅓ cup unrefined sugar into a small bowl. Gently press one side of each cookie into the sugar, and then place cookies sugar-side-up onto cookie sheets. Bake the cookies for 15-18 minutes, or until they are firm to the touch (the thicker you slice them, the longer they will take to cook).
  7. Allow cookies to rest on the baking sheet for about 10 minutes before transferring them to a wire rack and allowing them to cool (if you try to lift them off the baking sheet too soon, they may crumble/break. When the cookies have cooled completely, allow the coconut icing to come to room temperature and spread half of the non-sugared sides with the icing. Sandwich the cookies together with the remaining shortbreads.

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What people are saying

  1. Rebecca says

    Ideally, should Einkorn wheat be soaked or fermented? Do you know on any people who are sensitive to regular wheat, find Einkorn wheat more tolerable?

    • Jenny says

      Ideally, YES, all grains including einkorn should be soaked/fermented; however, all einkorn flour that is readily available is a high-extraction variety, which means it’s sifted to remove most of the bran. Since the bran is the only part of the grain that contains the antinutrients, flour without the bran doesn’t necessarily need to be soaked/soured (though I recommend it). Consider this recipe a special, occasional treat for that reason.

      I was DXed with gluten sensitivity in 2004, did A TON to heal my gut, and I tolerate Einkorn without issue.

  2. says

    I’ve never heard of Eikorn flour before this, thanks for sharing, being gluten free myself it’s nice to hear of new flours (rice and quinoa flours are sooooo last year). These cookies look heavenly!

    • Jenny says

      To clarify, Einkorn is NOT gluten-free. Rather, it is an ancient form of wheat that is tolerated by many people who are gluten-intolerant.

  3. Karen says

    For the coconut cream – are you referring to the same product as “coconut butter” which is also called coconut cream concentrate or are you referring to the thickened cream that can be skimmed from a can of coconut milk? Thanks.

    • says

      Hello! These look AMAZINGLY yummy! Do you think they would work using almond flour? I am grain free and while the excitement of Einkorn is intriguing, my belly would not like me. :(
      Thanks for the delicious and inspirational recipes!

      • says

        Hi April!
        I have not tested these with almond flour so I can’t say for sure. That said, I bake with it a lot and can’t think of a reason why that substitution wouldn’t work…I might try combining it with some coconut flour so that the cookies wouldn’t be too “heavy”.

    • says

      Hi Karen,
      I was referring to the coconut cream that’s found at the top of the coconut milk. You can whip it like cream and then add the powdered sugar to it to make the icing.

  4. natalie says

    Thank you for the great recipe. We made these delicious cookies and we all loved them. I added some lemon juice/zest to the cream.

  5. Cynthia Schoenbauer says

    I am having a real problem with my thyroid being low lately now that I am consuming a lot fermented cabbage. Jenny, do you think the two could be related? Is cabbage that has been fermented still a goitrogen (disrupts thyroid function)?

  6. Anna says

    I subbed spelt as I don’t have a gluten problem, but I am avoiding most wheat. They turned out great! I also use the coconut cooking oil or cream, I just mix it with a bit of sucanat and the cookies are delicious!
    If anyone has a resource for einkorn flour in the Netherlands, please post ! I can’t find it online or what the Dutch name for it is.

  7. April says

    Hi, these look so delicious… I’ve been hoping to find a checkerboard cookie recipe that uses einkorn flour. Do you have any suggestions to make a vanilla flavor of this cookie? Thanks! :)

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