Chocolate Mint Mousse

Chocolate mint mousse- bittersweet and addictive – makes for a tasty summer treat.   The kind of treat that’ll make you forget your manners and start licking every last touch of the chocolate minty goodness from your fingertips.   Desserts don’t find their way to our supper table too often – aside from fresh fruit – but I couldn’t resist developing this sinfully easy treat. It’s the kind of sweet that’ll make your children beg and your guests wistfully accept any dinner invitation in hope that chocolate mint mousse might make a reappearance.

Truthfully, this chocolate mint mousse is more like a cross between a mousse and a stirred custard as, classically, mousse doesn’t incorporate the use of cream or milk.   Likewise, this chocolate mint mousse – as pudding-licious as it is – isn’t quite a pudding either since it uses no cornstarch that classic pudding thickener that serves no useful or nutritional purpose outside of its duties as a thickener.

My son and I visited the neighboring farmers market.   Yes, I know.   It’s ridiculous that even in the time off from running our farmers market, we still visit other markets as leisure.   Nonetheless, my little guy fell in love with this chocolate mint plant from a Certified Naturally Grown farm.   Who can blame him?   It’s chocolate and it’s mint.   Besides, the scraggly red cabbage seedling he picked up two weeks ago has since been devoured by neighboring chipmunks.   Who knew that chipmunks love cabbage so much?

So the chocolate mint found a home with a three-year old who promises tender care, and I found inspiration.

chocolate mint mousse

By Jenny Published: August 5, 2009

  • Yield: 08 Servings

Chocolate mint mousse- bittersweet and addictive - makes for a tasty summer treat.   The kind of treat that'll make you forget your …

Ingredients

  • 1 Handful of Chocolate Mint Leaves (if available, or any mint or no mint at all if you’re strapped)
  • 1 1/4 Cup Whole Milk or Cream
  • 4 whole Eggs
  • 1 Cup Cocoa Powder
  • 1/4 Cup Whole, Unrefined Cane Sugar
  • 1 Tbsp Vanilla Extract
  • 1/4 Tsp Mint Extract
  • 1/4 Tsp Unrefined Sea Salt

Instructions

  1. Crush the chocolate mint leaves, reserving a few as garnish. Crushing mint releases its flavors in a way that chopping and mincing just doesn’t do.
  2. Pour the milk or cream in a pot and heat it over a low flame, and when it comes to blood temperature remove it from the heat. Add the mint and allow it to steep in the warm milk for a ½ hour or so.
  3. Strain the mint leaves from the milk and return the milk to the stove heating it on a medium-low temperature.
  4. Add eggs, cocoa and salt.
  5. Whisk well until all ingredients are well-combined.
  6. Continue to cook over medium-low heat until the mousse is well-thickened. Whisk continously to make sure the mousse thickens evenly.
  7. Remove the chocolate mint mousse from the heat when it reaches a pudding-like consistency. Mix in the vanilla and mint extract.
  8. Pour into dishes and allow to cool. Garnish with chocolate mint leaves, fresh berries and fresh cream if you have it.

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What people are saying

  1. says

    Yum. I will have to try this – with cream I think :).

    What are your thoughts on Sally’s no chocolate stance? I know it’s the caffeine she’s worried about for the most part, which is why coffee is a no-no. I am trying to kick coffee right now to heal my adrenals/thyroid, but I’m not sure if I could give up chocolate all together. Especially not for carob. Blech!

  2. says

    I have plenty of chocolate mint growing beside our house… interestingly enough, I hardly ever think to use it. This definitely has the propensity to get me to change my mind.

    So simple! and the color of that mousse says it all!

    Jenny says: The chocolate mint mousse is very rich. I’m thinking of modifying it ever so slightly and adapting it for use as a chocolate truffle.

  3. says

    Yum! I have a huge patch of chocolate mint growing under the climbing wall. I figured if the kids fell at least they would land in a bushy mint patch since it grows like crazy.

    I’ve also been looking for a rich chocolate recipe that doesn’t ask for chocolate chips – thanks for not taking the easy road here. I’m making this one tomorrow!

  4. says

    @Shannon: I have issues with adrenals and thyroid, too. While going low-glycemic has helped me to no end, life without chocolate would not be worth it. My philosophy is spluge big, or not at all!
    Jenny, the only way that mousse could look any better is if you were able to get George Clooney to hold the bowl.:)I look forward to trying it.

  5. Renee says

    That mousse looks wonderful! Chocolate mint is my very favorite herb. Before I moved I had a ton of it growing. Now, I have to start over in a new garden at a new house, but chocolate mint is going to be one of the first things planted! Thanks for the recipe that I’ll save for future reference.

    • Jenny says

      Runaway Lawyer –
      You really should try it – it is super easy to make! I’m going to make it this weekend for some guests.

  6. Lo says

    I’ve made this mousse recently. I did not use as many eggs.

    It is VERY delicious. It’s hard to quit eating! I keep going back to the fridge for some more. All that cocoa & mint have so much antioxidants, it makes me feel real good to eat it. I recommend it. Thanks for the recipe.

    I added sugar in this step also: “Add eggs, cocoa and salt.”

  7. Libby Cain says

    I’m not sure what I did wrong, but this mousse was horrible. The cocoa was totally overpowering as was the mint flavor. I made it for guests and nobody would eat it after the first bite including me. The picture was no longer on the blog so I don’t know if it looked right or not, but I definitely wouldn’t recommend this recipe.

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